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Poster: Dudley Dead Date: Jan 2, 2011 1:40pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: The Dead and the Rolling Stones

Responding to the "Beatles " thread, got me thinking how unexceptional most of the Dead's covers of the famous British band were . Most of these covers, sound ( especially in the Vince era ) like some band a wedding reception .
Only a Deadhead would think there covers of "The Last Time", or "Satisfaction", are anything special . Now their covers of the Stones covers , like "NFA", "It's All Over Now", King Bee" etc. are another matter, since the Stones are covering American artists, the Dead are in their element here (duh ...)
There is a question of them knowing the originals, but I believe e they have comments that they first learned these songs from those early Rolling Stones records .
I think the only Who song they did was Vince's attempt at "Baba O'Riley", that is just sounds like a bar band doing a "Classic Rock" number ; and of all the great songs by the Who, an extremely unimaginative choice .
Like their Beatles,covers , it was sort of like "well thats cool, they did that:, but rarely something all that musically compelling .

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Poster: dark.starz Date: Jan 2, 2011 8:38pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Dead and the Rolling Stones

* Not Fade Away was authored and composed by Charles Hardin, better known as Buddy Holly and King Bee was written by McKinley Morganfield, better known as Muddy Waters.

* Do you ever recall the Um Bop Um Bop Coda between the Dead and their clapping audience in the final years of the 530 performances of this 3 chord little ditty?

And i do recall hearing that Jesus was Buddha and Muhammad was Allah, and Moses and Joseph were the Water Boy's!

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Poster: Dudley Dead Date: Jan 3, 2011 8:26am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Dead and the Rolling Stones

Yes I am aware of the original artists , if I understand your point . I can't point out the interview, but I think they ( Garcia?) did say they learned those songs from those early Rolling Stones records . Now this wouldn't preclude them from being aware of, or having heard the originals , but basing their interpretations on the Stones versions , or being inspired by their versions, to cover those songs themselves .
Later, they did add the "bop,bop"s of the BUddy Holly original to the end of NFA .
I think, in a similar fashion the Bob Weir "Lovelights" ("Lovelite", to Bobby bashers ), they tried to put more of a swinging R&R feel to it , like the original Bobby Blue Bland version , rather than the harder edged Pigpen ones .
On a side note , though Muddy did a great "King Bee", I think it was written, by Slim Harpo ( The Stones also covered his "Hip Shake", on "Exile").

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Poster: dark.starz Date: Jan 3, 2011 7:41pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Dead and the Rolling Stones

Pigpen was born Ron McKernan on September 8, 1945 in Palo Alto, California, where he also grew up. His father was a rhythm and blues disk jockey, so Pigpen got exposed to that type of music at an early age.

My understanding is that it was Pigpen who introduced Jerry, Phil & Bob to authentic, original American Blues Music.

Yes, and by coincidence, (aka The Beatles and Ed Sullivan)the British bands of that time got early radio and LP play performing covers of the great American Blues Artist's. The Stones, The Animals, Clapton, Led Zepplin etc.

The Buddy Holly - Bo Didley riff was always the foundation of every American Garage Band, which the British Punk explosion seemed to emulate circa 1978 - 1979 post Disco.

What a rip, it took the Brits to introduce the great American Blues Artist's to the world audience, not the American public!

Thanks Dudley Dead for having a sense of humor!

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Poster: TOOTMO Date: Jan 3, 2011 7:47am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Dead and the Rolling Stones

" Do you ever recall the Um Bop Um Bop Coda between the Dead and their clapping audience in the final years"

GOOD GOD, Man! Are you saying that WE are responsible for Hanson?

TOOTMO

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Poster: advokat Date: Jan 3, 2011 8:13pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Dead and the Rolling Stones

Maybe not responsible, but another example of the "Bob Prob":

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rz3bcS4WDNY

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Poster: DeadRed1971 Date: Jan 2, 2011 3:36pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Dead and the Rolling Stones

Not to change the subject, but I heard recently that Judas Priest, in its earliest pre-Halford days with singer Al Atkins (1969-1973), played Truckin' as well as some Moby Grape and QMS stuff in pubs around Birmingham, UK. I wish I could find better info to confirm this.

This post was modified by DeadRed1971 on 2011-01-02 23:36:23

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Poster: cousinkix1953 Date: Jan 2, 2011 10:15pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Dead and the Rolling Stones

Satisfaction and the Last Time are the only Stones originals played too.

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Poster: vapors Date: Jan 3, 2011 3:37am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Dead and the Rolling Stones

For completeness sake - Pigpen and the Dead did cover the Stones original ‘Empty Heart’ back in 1966. It’s on the Rare Cuts and Oddities cd - from the Stones' second album 12x5, which also included their covers of 'Around and Around' and 'It's All Over Now' !

Also of note, the first Stones album contained some more cover songs that the Dead performed later - Not Fade Away, King Bee, I Just Want To Make Love To You, and Walking The Dog.

This post was modified by vapors on 2011-01-03 11:37:15

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Poster: hasher Date: Jan 3, 2011 11:10am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Dead and the Rolling Stones

Good knowledge.